Frequently asked questions

What is the flight time to the UK?

From Los Angeles the flight time is approximately 10.5 hours. From New York City the flight time is approximately 7 hours.

What is the time difference between the UK and the US?

London is +8 hours from Los Angeles and +5 hours from NYC (daylight saving March through October).

What is the currency exchange rate?

For the most current rate visit: www.xe.com/currencyconverter/convert/?From=GBP&To=USD

Where can I find information on weather in the UK?

Visit: www.timebie.com/sun/londonuk.php

Where can I find information on public holidays in the UK?

Visit: www.gov.uk/bank-holidays

What is VAT?

VAT is a tax on goods and services. Film Production Companies are not VAT exempt. Any VAT they incur can be reclaimed by filing a VAT return (which can be done on a monthly basis), but the actual VAT is not considered eligible expenditure for tax relief.

Do I need a visa to work on a production in the UK?

Visit http://britishfilmcommission.org.uk/guidance/work-permits-and-visas/

Is Ireland included in the UK?

Northern Ireland is part of the UK. The Republic of Ireland is separate and filming there is handled by the Irish Film Board.

How do you call the UK?

By dialling +44 before the UK area code and phone number. For example, the BFC UK contact number is +44 (0)20 7613 7675.

Do I need insurance for my production?

Yes, you must obtain specialised insurance to cover your specific production. You can search for UK media insurance companies in a range of online production directories (see our 'Useful Contacts' page).

What is the procedure for ariel filming?

The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) governs flight activities in the UK, including drones/un-manned aerial vehicles (UAV). Applications to operate a drone/UAV can be made here.

If you require other kinds of aerial filming, you can find a list of professional, licensed companies using a range of online production directories (see our 'Useful Contacts' page).

What is the procedure for working with children?

All children under “state school leaving age” (this maybe 16 or 18, depending on where you are filming) are required to be licensed by the child’s local education authority. This licence dictates the hours they are permitted to work, any special steps that need to be taken to protect the child, and other requirements.

The local education authority for where the production is being shot should also be informed. Using a UK line producer who is familiar with the child licensing procedure will ensure that your production meets all its requirements.

What is the procedure for working with animals?

When filming with animals, you must source animals that meet the productions requirements, and these must be from a known industry supplier/owner.

You must use either the RSPCA guidelines for the Use of Animals in the Audio-Visual industry; or the PAWSI Code, Guidelines and minimum standards for the Welfare of Animals in the Audio-Visual industries.

What is the procedure for using explosives in your production?

The professional employed must have the correct competencies for the work you want them to do. The Joint Industry Grading Scheme (JIGS) is the assessment scheme for certain practitioners in safety critical departments. You must also inform the relevant police department of your intent to use explosives.

A UK line producer will be familiar with the legislation and requirements around using explosives. The Health and Safety Executive has an information sheet outlining your legal obligations as well as best practice.

What is the procedure for using weapons in your production?

You must inform the police if you use any weapon (including replica and non-functioning weapons) in filming, even when shooting on privately owned land/locations. Please contact us, so that we can connect you with the relevant organisations.

The Health and Safety Executing has an information sheet outlining your legal obligations as well as best practice.

What are the smoking laws in the UK?

A ban on smoking in enclosed public spaces came into force in England on 1 July 2007. The ban applies to film sets just as it does to other venues, however, if an actor is required to smoke as part of his or her role, then there is an exemption to allow them to do so for that part of the shoot.

The regulations can be viewed in full at the Office of Public Sector Information website.